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Telly - oldbloke's mutterings
March 17th, 2012
09:43 pm
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Telly
OK, so what's good in 40"ish tellies?
LCD LED Plasma?
Brands to favour or avoid?

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From:bopeepsheep
Date:March 17th, 2012 10:25 pm (UTC)
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Samsung SMART tv: ver' ver' nice.

Before that, had a Sony Bravia Monolith thing that went wrong in an "automatic refund, no quibble" kind of way - wouldn't go there again but they may have improved it. (Something to do with overheating components, I forget.)
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From:hooloovoo_42
Date:March 17th, 2012 10:56 pm (UTC)
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If you're likely to want to subscribe to any of the streaming rental services, check out which brands automagically connect to which services. I have a 32" Sony Bravia which connects to Lovefilm but not Netflix. But the search Lovefilm search interface on the Sony is pants.

Make sure it has an internet connection, a USB port and a good crop of HDMI ports (and SCART if you still have a VCR you still want to use). Other than that, keep checking out Currys and wait until the summer. There will be some excellent deals around for the footy/Olympics.
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From:burkesworks
Date:March 17th, 2012 11:26 pm (UTC)
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I'd favour the LCDs above the plasmas, less to go wrong. TBH a lot of off-brand tellies are okay; I find many of them are relatively easy to service as most seem to have LG parts as standard. Problem with buying no-name boxen, of course, is customer support.

If you need a reliable set with decent tech support and good "bang for your buck", look no further than the Samsung range.
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From:oldbloke
Date:March 17th, 2012 11:27 pm (UTC)
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NB Our current telly is a 26" LCD from Philips.
We're looking coz the MiL wants to get rid of her CRT so we thought, give her ours, get a new one, maybe it's time to go to HD, not that the satbox is HD, but...
There's a 32" Tosh on offer in Costco, but they're not always great on fast-moving tech markets.
And then we were in John Lewis and the 40s didn't look stupidly big.
Until I held up a tape in front of our current one...

Edited at 2012-03-17 11:30 pm (UTC)
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From:pndc
Date:March 18th, 2012 11:11 am (UTC)
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Unless you have any specific requirements, whatever's being knocked out cheap in Richer Sounds. They get last year's EOLed models and flog them off at a discount. Prices are continuing to decline, so you might still want to hang on to the grubby old raster gun until it finally conks out if you want to save a few extra bob.

A "LED" TV is still an LCD, but it uses white LEDs to generate the backlight. Older designs use fluorescent lighting. LED is better, but only use it as a tie-breaker between two otherwise-identical sets because it doesn't make a significant difference. (Mostly, LED is theoretically easier to repair when it goes wrong, but TV shops went out with the Thatcher government.) There's new LED technology around the corner where the actual pixels are LEDs, but you won't get it confused to current "LED" TVs due to the order of magnitude price difference.

You may as well aim for a set with 1080p resolution, aka "Full HD" rather than 720p, aka "HD Ready". There's not much difference price-wise, and old eyes may not be able to tell much difference, but it's nice to get the model where it's definitely not the TV that's causing the picture to be swimming around in a blurry fog...

Plasma is old technology and *eats* electricity. They're a fair bit cheaper than LCD - presumably the stock is being dumped - and some people prefer the image quality, so might be an option if you don't care about the power cost, either because you love the picture or you just don't expect to use it often enough for it to matter.

LG is cheap. Some may consider it nasty. The menuing system on mine is atrocious, but it's only plugged into a computer and all I do is turn it on and off. If you have complex and unexpected requirements such as being able to change channel, it might not be for you. Of course, other manufacturers also have user interfaces that suck hard. Again, going into a shop and having a play is the only way to find out what you like.

Also, consider a projector. If you're going to have a home cinema, do it properly with velvet curtains and somebody wandering up and down the living room with ice cream and orange juice.
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